Alleged serial killer Bruce McArthur has been charged with a seventh murder as police are reportedly examining a further FIFTEEN cases.

McArthur, 66, is accused of killing Abdulbasir Faizi who disappeared in Toronto in 2010.

The 42-year-old was a dad-of-two who had emigrated to Canada from Afghanistan with his family.

After he went missing, they launched a desperate search and discovered he had been secretly using gay dating apps.

His wife concluded he had simply abandoned her and filed for divorce in 2012, the Toronto Star reports.

But detectives investigating the McArthur case revealed they had found unidentified remains at a home where six other victims were found.

They have now been identified as belonging to Mr Faizi and McArthur faces another murder charge.

The landscape gardener is alleged to have targeted gay men in the city for decades.

Crime experts fear he could have beeen as prolific as killers John Wayne Gacy and Jeffrey Dahmer.

The other victims have been named as Andrew Kinsman, Selim Esen, Majeed Kayhan, Soroush Mahmudi, Dean Lisowick and Skandaraj Navaratnam.

Earlier this year, cops said investigators had identified 30 properties that belong to McArthur's clients – and admitted they expect to uncover more remains.

They are looking into cold cases going back as far as 1975.

The McArthur case has chilling echoes with the crimes of Robert Pickton, a Canadian serial killer known as 'The Butcher' who murdered 49 women, cut up their bodies and fed them to his pigs.

The scruffy loner, now 68, would lure women to his farm in Vancouver and torture and murder them before disposing of them.

Pickton was convicted of six counts of second-degree murder and was sentenced to life in prison in 2007.

Both appeared to target what one profiler back in the 1990s called 'disposable victims' – Pickton picked the women up from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, several square blocks of seedy hotels, drug dealers and survival prostitution, while McArthur allegedly selected marginalised gay men in Toronto's Gay Village.

Police in Toronto are accused of mishandling investigations in both cases.

Dr Ciarán O'Keeffe, the head of the Psychology Department at at Buckinghamshire New University, said: “There's parallel in the geography aspect - a very focused, targeted area where the victims have been sought, abducted and dumped.”

“If they go missing the authorities aren't too concerned,” he added.

“Some of McArthur's alleged victims were immigrants and a particular subsection of the population.”

Dean Lisowick, who remains were found at the Leaside property, was a male sex worker and a drug addict.

Constable Danielle Bottineau, Toronto Police Service and LGBTQ liaison officer, said: "The accused in this matter preyed on quite a few members of the racialised community, probably knowing full well they weren't out with their culture, weren't out to their family and friends.”

Both men were also arrested for violent crimes before they were accused of murder.

McArthur was convicted of assault with a weapon and assault causing bodily harm for assaulting a man with a metal pipe in October 2001, court documents show.

One of the conditions of the sentence he received barred him from an area that included the city’s Gay Village and prohibited him from spending time with “male prostitutes”.

Meanwhile, a woman managed to escape Pickton and ran, naked and bleeding, after stabbing the killer with his own knife in 1997.

But the drug addict was considered unreliable by police and Pickton was not prosecuted.

Dr Ciarán O'Keeffe said: “How did it escalate at that point to murder? There's an interesting parallel with those first violent offences.”

The forensic psychology expert believes there are potentially a lot more victims.

He said: “Looking back, there's a number of missing person reports that McArthur may be responsible for.

“For 16 or so years he could have been committing these murders.”

As to motive, Dr O'Keefe said that he could not pinpoint one without interviewing the alleged killer.

But he says McArthur's suppression of his sexuality – he was married and had children before coming out – could have contributed.

He said: “Without knowing anything more, it's not a huge leap to say there is some connection between the early part of his life where this part of his sexuality was kept secret.

“The rage that's come out could be as a result of that.”

“There's also an addictive element. The initial murders can be for a number of different reasons, such as the gratification of sexual impulses.

“If the first murder happened by accident but he achieved pleasure from that, then in subsequent murders he could have sought to get that pleasure again.

“Or was it to cover something up? Did the victim threaten to report something that happened and the aggressive act (to silence the accuser) became part of the pleasure?”

Author and crime expert James Dubro says McArthur could rank among the most prolific gay serial killers in North America.

He told the Toronto Sun: “This is totally beyond anything I’d feared.

“We could be talking (John Wayne) Gacy and (Jeffrey) Dahmer territory here.”

Paul Ciantar, 54, has friends who know McArthur.

He told CNN: "They all said that they never would have suspected him.

“He looks like Santa Claus. He looks harmless. That probably really helped him."

Posted Date : April 12, 2018
Ref : Mirror

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